Last month, Marvel Comics fans lost their collective minds when they read (or read about) Captain America: Steve Rogers #1, where it was revealed that Captain America was an agent of Hydra. Not only was it revealed that Steve Rogers has been working with Hydra, but according to the comic, he had been recruited to be an agent of the evil organization back in the 20s. The internet went absolutely crazy over the news, but now everyone can finally calm down. Or possibly get upset for a completely different reason.

Be warned, there are huge spoilers ahead in this article for Captain America: Steve Rogers #2, so if you haven't read it and want to be surprised, come back and read this afterwards. In Steve Rogers #1, it looked as though Captain America had murdered his partner and then muttered the words "Hail Hydra," which sent the collective web on an all out rage spiral. In a recent interview with Comic Book, the record has been set straight by Marvel editor-in-chief, Axel Alonso, and it turns out, Steve Rogers is not actually a Hydra agent.

"We're trained to anticipate a strong reaction to change or a big plot twist like this, whether it's a female Thor or the new Ms. Marvel or the Korean-American Hulk. We didn't expect the reaction to be anywhere this big. It was comparable to the way that people reacted to the death of Captain America. I think a lot of the people reacting most violently aren't people that go to the comic book stores every Wednesday and are trained to understand the way the comics work and the rhythms and how we could do this kind of thing with our heroes."

In the new book, it is revealed that Steve Rogers only has memories of being taken in by Hydra. They were planted there by Kobik, who in the comics is a sentient version of the Cosmic Cube, who, becomes a human girl. Yes, comic books are very weird and not as much like the movies as some of us think they are. As it turns out, Kobik is being influenced by Captain America's arch enemy, The Red Skull, and that is how all of this craziness came to be. So now, Cap is not actually a Hydra agent, but everything isn't going to be sunshine and roses, according to Alonso.

"Captain America, one of the most trusted superheroes in the Marvel universe, is not exactly who you think he is. He is operating with a different and sinister intent now and every interaction that we see from here on in will be shaded by that. That's a story that Nick wanted to tell, and that's a story that's going to be fascinating for the next two months and a story that's going to build to big, big things within the Marvel universe as well."

Alonso also pointed out that the reveal in issue #2 of Captain America: Steve Rogers is going to facilitate an entirely new discussion. Fans will likely be relieved that Rogers isn't actually a Hydra agent, but we can already smell the anger storm waiting to happen from those who feel like it was some sort of a publicity stunt, or by those who feel they have been fooled. Twists like this are nothing new in the world of comic books, and like Alonso pointed out, the bulk of people voicing outrage were not likely to be regular readers, as they would have probably understood this was going to resolve itself in some way that didn't lead to Marvel ruining the legacy of one of their most iconic characters.

Nick Spencer, who is currently writing the series, even received death threats from fans after the book came out last month. Many other creatives like Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn voiced their distaste for such reactions from fans, saying that it is just a comic book. Gunn even Tweeted a photo of an old comic book page, where Captain America was turned into a wolf saying "Marvel ruined my childhood by making Captain America a wolfman," in an attempt to lend some perspective. Captain America: Steve Rogers #2 comes out tomorrow.

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