The Comedy

(2012)

Indifferent to the notion of inheriting his father's estate, a Williamsburg guy passes the time with his friends, playing games of mock sincerity and irreverence.

EXCLUSIVE: Tim Heidecker Talks ‘The Comedy’

EXCLUSIVE: Tim Heidecker Talks ‘The Comedy’

Look deep into the eyes of Tim Heidecker during certain unhinged moments in this year's earlier release Tim and Eric'$ Billion Dollar Movie, and you will see true demons rising to the surface. He is bitter. Angry. A man fighting against the world. And that's where some of his best comedic moments come from. Taken out of context, its not hard to see a man devoted to the craft of acting. He has a humanistic skill set that escapes even the most gifted of performers. It's a needed tool when delivering something as obscure and twisted as Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! It's a true belief in the material that enables this particular comedian to sell it home.

Now, Tim Heidecker brings those same instincts to The Comedy. Despite its title, the movie only wades through a shallow pool of uncomfortable laughs before quickly descending into the madness of a tortured soul. It's more of a psychological horror movie than it is a straight forward drama. You will watch some scenes on the edge of your seat, fearful of the anticipated moment that you know is coming. Tim Heidecker has the ability to break your heart in strange and unexpected ways. He gets under the skin, crawls around for a good bit, and then works at ripping apart your spin so thoroughly, there's no way you'll be able to stand straight after murking through this shadow boxing match replete with all the nonconformist terror one could hope for in a so-called "comedy".

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EXCLUSIVE: Director Rick Alverson Talks ‘The Comedy’

EXCLUSIVE: Director Rick Alverson Talks ‘The Comedy’

If you are heading into The Comedy expecting a follow-up to Tim and Eric'$ Billion Dollar Movie, you are in for quite a shock. While the film does offer a few early laughs from star Tim Heidecker, the story quickly descends into pitch black territory, and what we're left holding creeps deep into the horror genre. It's a disturbing psychological drama about a man whose life has no real meaning, as he sits and very impatiently awaits his father's death so that he can live out the rest of his life with little to no responsibilities.

The Comedy is also a time capsule of our current trendier than thou hipster culture, and it dissects that well-worn disenfranchised soul with an X-acto knife. It's an important look at the disintegration of the human spirit, while also being about hope and forgiveness. It falls at various different degrees, and will mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people. It's a polarizing film, and it's director, Rick Alverson, knows this.

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‘The Comedy’ Trailer Starring Tim Heidecker

‘The Comedy’ Trailer Starring Tim Heidecker

Tribeca Film has released the first trailer and poster for The Comedy, director Rick Alverson's character study starring Tim Heidecker. The story centers on Swanson (Tim Heidecker), a man who begins to test society's behavioral constraints just before he inherits his father's estate. Take a look at the one-sheet and the first video, also featuring Eric Wareheim and Neil Hamburger.

On the cusp of inheriting his father's estate, Swanson (Tim Heidecker, Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!) is a man with unlimited options. An aging hipster in Brooklyn, he spends his days in aimless recreation with like-minded friends (Tim and Eric co-star Eric Wareheim, LCD Soundsystem frontman James Murphy and comedian Gregg Turkington a.k.a. Neil Hamburger) in games of comic irreverence and mock sincerity. As Swanson grows restless of the safety a sheltered life offers him, he tests the limits of acceptable behavior, pushing the envelope in every way he can. Heidecker's deadpan delivery cleverly masks a deep desire for connection and sense in the modern world. The Comedy wears its name on its sleeve, but director Rick Alverson's powerful and provocative character study touches a darkness behind the humor that resonates with viewers long after the story ends.

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