Philosopher George Santayana said very famously that, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Now, I am not sure if the present US administration and other world leaders are having fuzzy memories, but we sure seem to be repeating something with North Korea and this whole nuclear arms deal. The fact that there is talk from both the US and North Korea about actually dropping nuclear bombs on one another leads me to believe that World War 3 might actually be a possibility. So we better get prepared. And what better way to prepare for Doomsday than with some of the best movies ever made about the subject?

With IMDB serving as a comprehensive guide, we now turn and look at what some of those movies are and what they mean. Yes, these bastions of celluloid escapism that show us (usually) in 2 hours less, that people can, despite all ideas to the contrary, make the best choices during the the worst of situations. Sadly, it often takes those situations for us to make such choices. And since so many of us are visual learners, as this situation seems to be getting more volatile by the hour, we thought what better medium to turn to as we prepare ourselves for armageddon?

Now, rather than just give you a list, we thought that in these frantic times we would break it down for you. There certainly is a chance that this list you are currently looking over might be the last list you will ever read. However, should nuclear war not come to pass (and we really hope it doesn't), we have you covered in every conceivable scenario.

We have a "Pre-Blast" list. This list is good if things settle down. If President Trump and Kim Jong-un squash it, we can look at these films as both cautionary tales and a way to conduct ourselves in the future. Should things escalate, we have a "Post Blast" list that will at least give you an idea of what to expect in your "new normal" of nuclear life. There is always the possibility that such a catastrophic and avoidable event could bring us together... which makes one wonder why we don't just come together without the threat of ending civilization? Last, there is our "If We Only Listened" section in which we get some perspective on why all our lives kinda suck right now.

So here's some advice...Read this list and then print it out. Should this whole thing actually come off you might find electricity in short supply. You might actually have to spend your time talking to people and reading books. You might return to a world where facts aren't countered by nonsense from sites like Twitter and Facebook (which will no longer exist, by the way). You're also going to need water and supplies but that's for a whole other list I hope I don't have to write as we dive into 12 movies that will help you prepare for an upcoming nuclear war with North Korea.

Dr. Strangelove (1964)

Dr. Strangelove

This biting satire from cinema luminary Stanley Kubrick would be a lot more fun to watch if we weren't kinda living this right now. A crazy general (Sterling Hayden) feels that the US is being poisoned by Russia. So he puts a nuclear deployment in motion that must be stopped. Trying to stop the catastrophe are generals and politicians who are just as inept (it seems) as the people who were recently elected to leadership positions in this country. (I certainly don't think our military is inept, I am using sardonic wit because, well, I don't want us all to die). I don't mean to be pessimistic, but Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb sort of plays like a documentary when viewed through today's Reality TV lens.

Thirteen Days (2001)

Thirteen Days

Watch this film a few times because we are literally right here right now. Okay, by the time you read this some of us might either not be here (and by that I mean they were obliterated), or the rumblings of back channel diplomacy that we are hearing about between the US and North Korea (which is actually what Thirteen Days is centered on) have actually proved fruitful. Thirteen Days brings viewers to the brink as they see John F. Kennedy deal with the Cuban missile crisis. We are given an in-depth look at the kind of cajoling, hand wringing and double dealing that goes into our political system and, somehow, manages to keep us all alive at the same time. Considering that we haven't really been this close to an incursion with North Korea since 1950, Thirteen Days should be mandatory viewing in every home in America.