300 was an unexpected box office phenomenon when it hit theaters in March 2007, pulling in $210 million at the domestic box office and $456 million worldwide. It helped define Zack Snyder as a visual storyteller. And it also launched an unlikely franchise at Warner Bros. Though Zack Snyder didn't return to direct the 2014 sequel 300: Rise of an Empire, he stayed on as a producer. And the follow-up didn't fare too poorly despite most of the original main cast not returning. Now, Zack Snyder is considering yet a third film. And this time, he might actually take the action out of ancient Greece.

It has already been reported that Zack Snyder wants to make an epic George Washington biopic in the style of 300. As it turns out, this movie might actually serve as basis for 300 3. But that's not the only idea he's been thinking about. He believes that the next 300 sequel could take place almost anywhere that history had a great battle. Speaking to Collider, this is what the director had to say when asked if there would be another sequel.

"There may be. There may be. We've been talking a lot about sort of different incarnations of 300. We've been talking about is there a way, possibly, we move out of Ancient Greece and use it as a framing device for other conflicts that happened throughout history. I think I mentioned that we talked about the Revolutionary War version, and we talked about the Alamo, and we've talked about there's a battle in China, a "Lost Legion" kind of concept, any of those kinds of things are on the table."

The one thing all of these battles have in common is that they pit a small, outmatched army against in imposing, unstoppable force. That's the same idea behind both 300 and 300: Rise of an Empire. Though, the victors are not the same in all of these fights. Spoiler Alert! While the small force wins in the Revolutionary War, the same is not true for the poor Rebels fighting to defend the Alamo.

It's unclear if any of these battles would benefit from the same visual storytelling techniques that are used in 300. The movie derives its unique look from speed-ramping and lots of CGI. If 300 is to continue as a franchise, this might be the only way to do it on a successful level. What do you think? Sound off in the comments below.

B. Alan Orange