AMC Theaters is trying to shine a light on movies that don't have superheroes in them with a new program called AMC Artisan Films. The goal of the new program is to showcase "artist-driven" movies that, in the modern marketplace, have been having a difficult time rising about splashier titles such as Avengers: Endgame and Toy Story 4. AMC had this to say about the new program in their announcement.

"Filmmaking is an art, and AMC is its museum. And just as there are masterpieces of traditional art, there are exceptional works of film. AMC Artisan Films brings a curated gallery of the finest movies to AMC where everyone can enjoy them. Any movie with the AMC Artisan Films seal is an artist-driven film that advances the art of making movies."

The program officially launches this weekend with the release of Danny Boyle's Yesterday, which highlights the music of The Beatles. Despite that, it's heading for a relatively modest $10 million opening weekend. AMC, the largest theatre chain in the U.S., is hoping to give movies such as this more opportunity to be seen by a larger number of moviegoers. Other upcoming titles to be included in the series are Midsommar, Blinded By The Light, The Peanut Butter Falcon, Downton Abbey, The Art of Self-Defense, Luce, The Kitchen and Where'd You Go, Bernadette.

It's been a brutal year at the box office for mid-level titles such as the ones listed above. Critically heralded movies such as Booksmart, which got about as much buzz as a movie like that can get ahead of its release, simply couldn't compete. Other titles such as Late Night and the stop-motion animated Missing Link suffered similar fates. A program like this could help. Or, at the very least, can't hurt anything. Elizabeth Frank, Executive Vice President of worldwide programming and chief content officer for AMC Theatres, had this to say.

"Many consumers don't realize that we play more elevated and celebrated films than anyone else in North America. With the launch of AMC Artisan Films, we aim to expose more movie-goers to specialized films and increase their theatrical success. And we plan to increase consumer access to these special films by seeking earlier runs in platform releases and holding longer in theater to give audiences time to learn about them from other passionate guests."

The idea for the new program originated in a meeting AMC CEO Adam Aron and the Director's Guild of America, where it was stressed how important it is for theatre chains to get behind small and mid-sized movies. AMC promises aggressive promotion and consistent, convenient showtimes for Artisan titles. But why go through all of this? The fact of the matter is, theatre chains can't sustain on superhero movies alone. They need mid-level movies to succeed as well, just as much as certain moviegoers want to see titles such as these continue to get theatrical releases. For more information, head on over to AMCTheatres.com.

Ryan Scott