George A. Romero wants two more Dead films
There is a reason that legendary director George A. Romero is nicknamed the Grandfather of the Zombie. He created some of the most seminal Zombie films of all-time including Night of the Living Dead, Dawn Of The Dead and The Crazies. Romero returned to the genre that he practically created in 2005 with George A. Romero's Land of the Dead, which is the highest budgeted and highest grossing film of his career. Following that movie, the director decided to go back to his roots, and in 2007 made the low-budget film Diary of the Dead. While it was his fifth film in the popular "Dead" series of Zombie movies, Romero has stated that it is not a sequel to the other films and in fact will serve as the jumping off point for an entirely new series of films. The new series continues with the new film, George A. Romero's Survival of the Dead, which opens on April 30th.

We recently had a chance to sit down and speak with the legendary zombie director and asked him to explain his intent for this new series of films. "I have this idea. I'm off on a new track here with Diary of the Dead and this film, Survival of the Dead, sort of grows out of Diary. I have this conceit that I would like to do two more using characters from Diary," said Romero. "So that Diary would sort of be the Mother-ship of this little set of films that grows out of that and paints a portrait of what the world is like three months into the phenomenon. So I don't know? It depends on how this film performs financially as to whether or not I will get to do those films. But right now I love the idea. I still love doing these, so it would almost be like taking a vacation for me. If that happens I would really welcome it." We continued to press the director for more details on his purposed new series of Zombie films. "I have ideas for the next couple but we'll see how far they let me go with that. If I had my way I would do one in black and white and one in an old fashion 3D format like House of Wax. But I don't think I'd be able to get away with that," he explained. "It would be great fun to have them look completely different but be part of a trilogy. I don't know we'll see what happens?"

Romero has also seen several of his most famous films made into big-budget Hollywood remakes over the past few years including Zack Snyder's Dawn Of The Dead and more recently, Breck Eisner's The Crazies. While speaking with Romero, he didn't seem to hold either film, or the idea of doing remakes in general, in high regard. So we asked the director if there was any film from his past that he would like to see remade? "There is one that I always felt was a real failure. Its called Season of the Witch. I was trying to do a Women's Lib thing and I didn't understand anything about women's issues. I was too young to even pretend to have had enough relationships to understand that. Also the people who were financing it ran out of money in the middle and we had to finish it on half of the money that we were expecting to have. The acting was no good and I just think that I could do a better job with it today. I even think that it could be more pertinent today if she were a powerful woman in the world. Yet in her personal life was being squeezed and depressed." We followed up by asking Romero if that's a remake he would actually like to direct himself. Or if he was fine with another director taking a crack at it? "Yeah I've actually got half a script done on it. I would personally like to do it and it's one that I control," he answered.

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Finally, we finished by asking the iconic director if there were any classic films of his that he hopes don't get remade and that he would prefer Hollywood just left alone? "I've heard rumors about remakes being done of Knightriders and Martin. That would bother me more than anything else because I always think of those two films as mine. They are the most personal films I've made and I don't think that you can make them without me. They are uniquely my ideas and without me there's no idea there."