Tyrone Giordano InterviewImagine going from acting in one movie to making a film with Diane Keaton, Rachel McAdams, Dermot Mulroney, Sarah Jessica Parker and a host of other top tier actors in your second one? Tyrone Giordano had this experience when he was cast as Thad in The Family Stone. A deaf actor, this thespian seems to have taken a very philosophical view of not only working on such an "actor packed" film but his career in general.

How did you get cast in the role of Thad Stone?

Tyrone Giordano: I was doing the national tour of "Big River," and it just so happened that Fox was casting for the movie while we were in Los Angeles for our two-week run at the Ahmanson.  I auditioned for the part and met with Mr. Bezucha, and then learned I was to be cast.

Related: CONTEST: Own The Family Stone On DVD!

What was it like working with such a strong cast?

Tyrone Giordano: It was exhilirating and terrifying all at once to learn that I was going to be running with the big dogs.  My first thought upon learning the news: "How am I going to keep up with these people?!"

Did you have any moments where you were completely starstruck?

Tyrone Giordano: It came time for rehearsals (which I hear are rare in the film world--too costly), and we broke the ice, taking a step towards feeling at ease with each other, like a real family.  I was now able to be star-struck and feel at ease knowing that the rest of the cast, like me, was human, too.  I was in awe of how each of them worked--Ms. Keaton was a real pro, and every take she would pull something different out of her bag of tricks.  I learned about giving the director as many choices as possible for the final edits from her. 

From Ms. Parker, I learned about an unbeatable work ethic and she's such a joy to be around, so genuine and sweet, and so damn smart.  Mr. Mulroney was like the big brother on the set, always kidding around with everyone, and Mr. Wilson, who would crack us all up with his stream-of-consciousness.  Ms. Keaton had seen me in "Big River" at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles, and she raved about the production, so it was very nice to see a star star-struck by someone who was star-struck!

How did you get into acting?

Tyrone Giordano: I got into acting "by accident," when I was asked to audition for a small company after I graduated from college.  I did not even intend to audition--I was simply there to wish my friend good luck at hers, and the director came out and singled me out because I was a male, and they needed more males.  Sure enough, I got in, and the group was comprised of 12 females and 3 males. Then after that, it was at Deaf West Theatre that my career took off--I'm grateful for the opportunities afforded me.

Did you get to work with Henry Winkler when you did Out Of Practice? If so, what was that like? Are you a Happy Days fan?

Tyrone Giordano: I worked with Christopher Gorham and Ty Burrell in a very short scene.  It was total fun working on a TV set--best of both worlds: television in front of a live audience!  I love live audiences.  I met the rest of the cast, and they're all warm, sweet people.

What advice would give aspiring actors?

Tyrone Giordano: Don't take the business too seriously.  There's a reason they call it "show business," and not "show art."  If you can eke out a living doing what you love, so much the better, but always, always have a backup plan.  A tiny percentage of actors make enough money to justify it being the only job an actor has.

What do you have coming up next?

Tyrone Giordano: You may have seen me as Ashton Kutcher's older brother in A Lot Like Love.  As for my future: I know it sounds contrived, but I'm working on developing some work of my own, both inside and outside of entertainment, I am even starting my own ASL tutoring business here in L.A..  Because I am deaf, roles are few and far in between, and hopefully find people who, like Mr. Bezucha, have the chutzpah to cast an actor who is deaf in their work.

The Family Stone is available on DVD through Fox Home Entertainment.

Dont't forget to also check out: The Family Stone