World famous criminal defense attorney F. Lee Bailey, best known for representing O.J. Simpson and other high profile clients in his career, has passed away. The lawyer's oldest son, Bendrix Lee Bailey, says his father died Thursday morning while in hospice care in Georgia. Per TMZ, the family is also contributing his death to old age, and his illness was not related to COVID-19. He was 87 years old, passing just one week before his 88th birthday.

Bailey has represented criminal defendants in many high profile cases, which includes Sam Sheppard, Patty Hearst, and Albert DeSalvo. He is most famous for representing O.J. Simpson in what was deemed at the time to be the "trial of the century," resulting in an acquittal for the alleged double-murderer amid great controversy. Also including Johnnie Cochran, Robert Shapiro, and Robert Kardashian, the legal team was dubbed as the "Dream Team" of lawyers.

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The famous murder trial was dramatized in the 2016 miniseries The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. Featuring Cuba Gooding Jr. as Simpson, the acclaimed series won the Emmy for Outstanding Limited Series, among others. Nathan Lane played Bailey on the series, which also starred David Schwimmer as Kardashian, Courtney B. Vance as Cochran, and John Travolta as Shapiro.

On Twitter, Simpson posted a video lamenting the loss of his "great friend," whom he also called "one of the great lawyers of our times." The alleged double-murderer also claims that just one week ago, Bailey finished a book he was writing about the trial, supposedly offering his take on what happened along with "some of the facts that the public was not aware of." Bailey's previous work as an author includes a legal novel called Secrets, which is about a famous criminal lawyer who's indicted on a phony murder rap.

After the O.J. trial, Bailey's career saw some turbulence. He was disbarred in 2001 in Florida and in 2002 in Massachusetts for financial misconduct while defending Claude Louis DuBoc. When Bailey took and passed the bar exam in Maine in 2009, the state's Board of Bar Examiners squashed that as well. He later filed for bankruptcy in 2016 due to millions of dollars in debut owed to the IRS from undeclared stocks.

Bailey also had brief stints on television during his lifetime. In 1969, he hosted an RKO TV special conducting a mock trial about the infamous "Paul is dead" rumor about Paul McCartney. The program only aired once locally in New York City. He had also hosted the TV series Good Company in 1967, which saw him interviewing celebrities in their homes. In 1983, he would again snag another gig as a TV host when he hosted an incarnation of Lie Detector, a show where Bailey questioned guests who were subjected to polygraph tests.

During his life, Bailey had been married four times and had three children; his fourth wife, Patricia Shiers, died in 1999. Bailey reportedly didn't want a funeral, but the family is considering a celebration of life. Rest in peace. This news comes to us from TMZ.