It's safe to say some fans still haven't gotten used to the idea of an all-female Ghostbusters, or the fact that the reboot will be a completely new origin story. In the latest issue of Empire Magazine, director Paul Feig goes on the defensive, explaining why he wants a new take on this old franchise, and why he opted for a female cast as opposed to a mixed team of Ghostbusters. He also claims that this version of Ghostbusters will be much scarier than the 1984 original, and says that while he'd like to make an R rated movie, this reimagining will be rated PG-13.

Paul Feig has a very good reason for not wanting to make a direct sequel to Ghostbusters. He loves and respects the work done by Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis and director Ivan Reitman too much to tamper with the classic.

"I have too much respect for the original one [to do a sequel]. There's also the feeling that once the world knows ghosts and has seen them busted on such a large scale, they run the risk of becoming pedestrian. There's something fun about introducing our world, which has never seen ghosts to the phenomenon of ghosts. I love origin stories and to introduce new characters."

He doesn't mind addressing the controversial choice for an all-female cast head-on. He didn't decide on this for any other reason than the fact that he thinks it will be funny.

"A lot of people accused it of being a gimmick. I guess I can see the cynics' view of it, but for me I just love working with funny women. People said, 'Why don't you do a mix?' I'm just more interested in the idea of lady Ghostbusters. It's the way my brain works. It won't be called Lady Ghostbusters! Certainly not...Ghostbustieres is the way to go."

While the recent Sony Hack revealed that Emma Stone and Jennifer Lawrence want to lead this new Ghostbusters, they haven't been cast yet. And it sounds like we may not get a confirmation on the cast for quite some time.

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"Right now, honestly, there could be 50 Ghostbusters. I'm just waiting to get our first draft of the script together to go, 'Who makes sense in these roles?' If I put the list in front of me of people that have said they want to do it, talk about a Sophie's Choice. When you do a movie like Ghostbusters, people get very interested."

Finally, the director reiterated previous statements about this being a truly scary movie. While it will certainly push the boundaries of its PG-13 rating, it won't be R rated, as is the case with Paul Feig's last couple of movies.

"I want ours to be scarier than the original, to be quite honest. Katie Dipold and I are so focused on wanting to do scary comedy. We don't want to hold back. The reason I do a lot of R-Rated comedies is that you want a movie to feel honest. But the Ghostbusters world doesn't need that level of swearing. We'll have to be PG-13 with this one. I would like to make it R-Rated, but I won't. You want the biggest number of people to watch it and not be put off by it."

What do you think so far? Is Paul Feig proving himself worthy of the franchise with his ideas so far? Or are you still disappointed that the original Ghostbusters won't be back?

B. Alan Orange at Movieweb
B. Alan Orange