One of the biggest complains about J.J. Abrams, and one of fans biggest fears heading into Star Wars: Episode VII, is the director's propensity for secrecy. His 'mystery box' way of producing a film reached ridiculous heights with Star Trek Into Darkness, as he adamantly refused to reveal whom Benedict Cumberbatch was actually playing, referring to him only as the terrorist John Harrison.

This has lead to plenty of backlash in the months since the sequel debuted this summer. Many, including the director himself, think the movie might have been better received if the advertising had been trueful about the inclusion of iconic villain Khan in this sequel that has gone onto been called the worst Star Trek movie of all time (which including all entries in the franchise including the reboots, the originals and Star Trek: The Next Generation).

Speaking with MTV, the director goes onto place almost all the blame on the studio for this decision, which has been called 'pointless' by some of the franchise's most offended fans (and there are plenty of Trekkies out there that absolutely abhor this particular adventure).

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Here's what J.J. Abrams had to say, revealing that he had to keep the villain secret so that non-fans didn't feel alienated by the movie.

"The truth is because it was so important to the studio that we not angle this thing for existing fans. If we said it was Khan, it would feel like you've really got to know what 'Star Trek' is about to see this movie. That would have been limiting. I can understand their argument to try to keep that quiet, but I do wonder if it would have seemed a little bit less like an attempt at deception if we had just come out with it."

While J.J. Abrams makes no secret that he wants audiences to enjoy a movie to its full potential when first seeing it, thus his love of the so-called 'mystery box', he does admit that being upfront about Kahn would have been the smarter move. The director knew before hand that the revelation that Benedict Cumberbatch was Kahn wouldn't have spoiled anything about the plot of the movie itself.

Do you think this will change the way he approaches certain reveals for Star Wars: Episode VII? Or do you think he's still trying to cover his ass with fans that may not hold him in the same kind of esteem?

B. Alan Orange at Movieweb
B. Alan Orange