Ever wondered what it actually would have cost to go to Jurassic Park? The answer is $550. At least to start. While there are many other costs that would have been involved, we finally know what a three-day park pass would have set someone back. John Hammond never got to see his dream of having a fully-functioning dinosaur-filled version of Disneyland open and running for the all the world to see, but that was always his plan and they were very close to opening the doors before things went wrong. And now it's been revealed what they were going to charge.

Recently, some new officially licensed Jurassic Park merchandise hit the web in the form of a Visitor Centre Limited Edition Legacy Kit, which comes with quite a few neat little trinkets that hardcore fans might enjoy owning. There's a license plate, a map of Isla Nublar, some pamphlets, a visitors badge and even a "When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth" banner. But perhaps most interesting is the actual three-day park ticket, which reveals that the price to visit would have been $550.

Unfortunately, it doesn't have any information in regards to what a single-day pass would have gone for, but this is really our first window, five movies into this franchise, as to what such an extravagant and marvelous experience would run. Jurassic World made no mention of what they were charging, even though they were up-and-running before the Indominus Rex got loose and screwed that all up for everyone. For what it's worth, this is what the park entry would have gone for back in 1993. Using an online inflation calculator, that $550 translates to about $955 in today's dollars. That may sound steep, but considering that they have all of the attractions any other theme park would have, then adding in the cost of groundbreaking, bio-engineered, formerly extinct animals and all of the cost that brings to the table, it's not as bad as one might have thought.

Related: Jurassic World Live Tour Features New Dinosaur and Full-Size T-Rex

John Hammond never wanted Jurassic Park to be about the money. He wanted to share these creatures with the world. He saw beauty in it. There is even the scene when they're all gathered to have lunch at the park where John's lawyer, Donald Gennaro, the one who gets eaten off of a toilet by the T-rex, is saying that they can charge whatever they want and people will pay it. John says that these attractions deserve to be seen by everyone around the world, to which Donald replies that they can have a "coupon day."

Still, a visit to Isla Nublar to see these dinos, had things gone another way, would still have been an expensive endeavor. The travel expense, in particular, is worth considering. In any event, for hardcore fans who always wanted this to be a reality as opposed to a piece of Hollywood fiction cooked up by Steven Spielberg and Michael Crichton, this is a key piece of the puzzle. For those who want to actually check out and perhaps purchase the merch bundle, which goes for $57.99, head on over to Merchoid.

<strong><em>Jurassic Park</em></strong> 3-Day Pass

Ryan Scott