The success of the R-rated blockbuster Deadpool has emboldened movie studios to push for more R-rated movies. One of the by-products of this was 20th Century Fox's Logan being crafted as an R-rated superhero movie, but that is not the only thing that sets Logan apart. As fans noticed this weekend, there is no post-credits scene, which was quite disappointing for most fans, but during a new interview, writer Scott Frank talks about the inclusions of a surprising villain. If you haven't seen Logan yet, there will be SPOILERS below, so read on at your own risk.

One of the other ways the movie was set apart was the inclusion of a surprise Deadpool 2 teaser which played between the trailers and the movie itself. Another big surprise fans received was towards the end of the film, with the emergence of X-24, a new Logan clone that looked just like a young Wolverine, who squared off against the aging Logan at the end of the film. In a separate interview, writer Scott Frank discussed why he thought it was important to bring in X-24. Here's what he had to say below.

"It was an interesting thing - for him to be confronted with himself. It reminds him of what he once was. He was not a good guy. But we didn't want to make a meal out of it. You have to be careful that that doesn't become the concept through the whole movie, because then it does exactly the opposite of what we were trying to do."

The writer also confirmed that the movie wasn't beholden to the X-Men universe, which director James Mangold has stated in the past. Since the film is set farther in the future than any other X-Men movie, it gave the filmmakers the freedom to tell a unique story without worrying about continuity. Here's what the writer had to say below.

"We just kept going back to character and his relationship with his "father" and his relationship with someone who is genetically created, but is still technically his daughter. We kept it personal the whole time. That's really what we were obsessed with. You could feel it as we were writing it that it was accruing to something powerful at the end. We didn't have to connect it to any larger "universe." Or as Jim keeps saying, "we didn't have to sell Happy Meals." And so that was great. Whereas, the last one, my favorite part is where he's in the middle of rural Japan and with this woman and being a human being and feeling what it's like to be a human being. But we're not there very long before we're back to giant robots and stuff. And then it becomes just another superhero movie with a lot of CG stuff. And we were trying to avoid that this time around and the studio had changed studio heads and they were very much into the idea of trying something new, because otherwise what's the point? The only way these movies have value is if they become about something else. They can't all about saving the world."

In 2024 the mutant population has shrunk significantly and the X-Men have disbanded. Logan, whose power to self-heal is dwindling, has surrendered himself to alcohol and now earns a living as a chauffeur. He takes care of the ailing old Professor X whom he keeps hidden away. One day, a female stranger asks Logan to drive a girl named Laura to the Canadian border. At first he refuses, but the Professor has been waiting for a long time for her to appear. Laura possesses an extraordinary fighting prowess and is in many ways like Wolverine. She is pursued by sinister figures working for a powerful corporation; this is because her DNA contains the secret that connects her to Logan. A relentless pursuit begins ... In this third cinematic outing featuring the Marvel comic book character Wolverine we see the superheroes beset by everyday problems. They are aging, ailing and struggling to survive financially. A decrepit Logan is forced to ask himself if he can or even wants to put his remaining powers to good use. It would appear that in the near-future, the times in which they were able put the world to rights with razor sharp claws and telepathic powers are now over.

Cinemark Movie Club