We haven't heard anything about The Lost Boys 4 since Lost Boys: The Thirst, the third movie in the series, came out in 2010. A year after that sequel's release, star Corey Feldman, who plays one half of the iconic Frog Brothers duo Edgar Frog, told us the franchise was basically dead. And that no new Frog Bros. adventure was moving forward. We recently caught up with the iconic 80s actor to talk about his new album Angelic 2 the Core, which is out now. And he sounds a bit more optimistic about the possibility of Edgar Frog rising from the ashes to fight evil monsters once again. But if he has his way about it, with his say and his sway looming over the franchise, whatever the next Lost Boys is, it probably won't follow the current trend in all-girl reboots.

You might say to yourself, 'But it says BOYS right there in the title! Case closed!' Sure, but anyone with a good memory will know that the idea of The Lost Girls was often talked about in the pages of both Fangoria and all the teen magazines Corey Feldman used to pose for back in his acting heyday. As far back as the late 80s, the original idea was for The Lost Boys 2 to be an all-female sequel, preceding the current trend of girl-centric reboots by almost thirty years. If that tells you how long it's taken to get this far. That iteration of a sequel never happened. And it wasn't until 2008's Lost Boys: The Tribe that this horror comedy series actually became a bonafide franchise, albeit one built for a home video audience. And while Corey Feldman did return in that movie as Edgar Frog, it was basically a reboot that set up a whole new cast of characters.

The Tribe was not well received by fans, with Corey Feldman having more influence over the next sequel The Thirst, which actually gave the Frog Brothers the fuel they needed. Fans were quite happy to see both Corey Feldman and Jamison Newlander back together on screen, and the movie even set up a future sequel where the duo would fight off werewolves. That didn't happen. And now the property sits in limbo. There is talk that The Lost Boys will now be completely rebooted as a straight up theatrical remake, though nothing is officially in the works. But it's not a stretch to think Warner Bros. might go the all-female route, as they are doing with their upcoming Ocean's 11 franchise. That said, Corey Feldman still hopes to be a part of what comes next. Though, he absolutely does not like the original idea of The Lost Girls as a sequel, or a reboot, or whatever you want to call it.

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Feldman doesn't want to be taken out of context, and as we've seen with Ghostbusters, it could be easy to misinterpret his thoughts on the matter. Corey is in no way calling all-girl reboots and remakes a bad thing, and he's no sexist. He runs a company called Corey's Angels, which was set up to help women in the entertainment industry get a leg up without having to resort to dealing with some of the shadier sides of the business. His company was established to protect and empower actresses and models in a safe and sound working environment where they aren't in constant fear of bottom feeders, or where they have to jump through casting couch hoops to get throwaway gigs. In many ways, having an all-girl Lost Boys would be great for some of the women he represents and he quite clearly acknowledges that such a thing would be in his clients' best interests. But after seeing all the hate pointed towards Ghostbusters, he'd rather not tarnish the legacy of the original 1987 movie with such a reboot.

Corey Feldman is not a fan of the reboot or remake, and simply doesn't want to do another Lost Boys that is basically ripping off the franchise name without giving longtime fans what they truly want. He feels an all-girl Lost Boys would be a gimmick that doesn't fall in line with what has come before it. If anything, he wants to see The Lost Boys 4 happen in a way that wouldn't anger or upset the longtime fan base, which he knows is nearly impossible. But the danger now of simply saying he doesn't want an All-Girl Lost Boys, no matter how good his intentions may be, sets the actor in direct fire of being publicly criticized, and that's not want he wants. He just doesn't want the popular title to become something that fans despise, and he wants whatever comes next to be something that is as beloved as the original, or why do it at all? Feldman knows full well that coming out against any all-girl movie puts him directly in the line of fire, but he just can't bring himself to say that for The Lost Boys, it's at all a good idea.

"After what happened with Ghostbusters, I would veer to stay away from that idea. I'm not a hater. I encourage all artistic endeavors. And I support anything as long it's good. I just hate seeing crap, and I hate seeing schlock. And I hate seeing when they take a very valuable and positive franchise and destroy it with something that sounds like a really good idea, but is not. So, to me...I'm a firm believer in giving the fans what we know they want. And give it to them the way they want it. It's always nice to throw some surprises in there. But I am also not a believer in the reboot. I do not think it is a good idea. I don't like it. I think when fans want a sequel to their favorite films, they want to see their favorite characters, and their favorite actors playing those characters, and they want to know where those characters are ten years later, or a few years later. And that is the fun of a sequel. That is in my personal opinion as a filmgoer and a movie maker. That doesn't mean I'm right. Everyone has the right to their opinion. I have to make sure my intentions are pure. Obviously, owning a company called Corey's Angels, where we work with beautiful talented women, it would only behoove my best interests to move a project like [an All-Female Lost Boys] forward, because I could put a bunch of girls to work. I just don't know that it makes sense for this franchise. I guess that's the bottom line. It seems like a stretch. Not only does it seem like a stretch, but it just doesn't sound like the most appetizing way to move forward. I guess this is a good way to put it for a vampire movie. That sounds like a gimmick. And that doesn't sound like a good reason to go there. If there was a good story line, that happened to take place in a sorority...I don't know...But if it were a brilliant script, I would certainly consider it. But I think even as I say it, that it's not right to even go there."

That said, Corey Feldman wants to make it clear that Lost Boys 4, or whatever it ends up being, is no where closer to moving forward than it was back in 2010, which is more than six years ago. But the franchise is not dead. And somehow, some why, Warner Bros. is not just going to sit on the property for very much longer without squeezing some more cash out of it. He says this about a sequel or reboot moving forward in the near future.

"Unfortunately, I don't know what is going on with any of that...In regards to that topic? Is there a possible future? Is there more life in the Frog Brothers and The Lost Boys? Absolutely! There is always the possibility. That is one of the things I'm most proud of. I've been instrumental in making that franchise come back to life, or helping that franchise come back to life. And being a big part of it. Do I see a future with possibly more Frog Brothers movies? Absolutely! Is it a guarantee? No! Do we have something on the table at the moment? No. But there might be some ideas kicking around. Lets just say, at this point, they are at the idea stage."

Back in 2010, even before Netflix starting debuting at least one original series a week, the idea of a Frog Brothers centric TV show for the streaming service had been bandied about. That could still happen, maybe even on The CW, since a Lost Boys or Frog Brothers TV show is perfect for the network's wheelhouse and the title is owned by parent company Warner Bros. About a possible Frog Brother TV show coming to Netflix or The CW, Feldman had this to say.

"That could be a possibility. Anything could be an option. But, I think if anything now, if I were to go back to Edgar, and the things we are talking about internally, it would be more along the lines of part four, or a theatrical version of the film again. I think that's where my mind's eye is."

Just a few weeks ago, as Corey Feldman was attempting to finish his new album Angelic 2 the Core and get it into the hands of fans, he helped fulfill some IndieGoGo campaign incentives by dressing as Edgar Frog and posing for personalized fan photos. It gave some hope that Edgar Frog had not yet disappeared completely. Though, Feldman doesn't want that vampire hunting photo session to be misinterpreted. It was all done in fun.

"What we did here, we basically said you pay whatever it was, ten or twenty bucks, and send us your request, exactly what you want me to do in your picture, and I'll do pretty much anything you say or want as long as it's not, you know, offensive or dirty. So they sent in their requests, and one of their requests happened to be, 'Would you mind putting on an Edgar Frog costume?' Which I happen to have, it's the first thing in the closet. 'So, sure, I'll do it once.' Then, of course, everyone wants the Edgar Frog. Right? So, that just became a thing. It's not like I was trying to rally any support for another movie, or anything like that."

Warner Bros.' will ultimately decided what to do with The Lost Boys franchise. And it won't be until after the all-female Ghostbusters hits theaters that people will understand how such a reboot conceit plays to the paying audience. If it is a hit, you can guarantee that there will be more all-girl movies moving forward in the near future. Will a reboot of The Lost Boys be one of them? Not if Edgar Frog has his way about it. But then again, if the remake happens, there is a very strong chance that, while it isn't a straight forward all-female reboot, the Frog Brothers could get a sex change. There's no telling how longtime fans would react to that. But in our current social climate, it certainly sounds like a way they could go.

B. Alan Orange