The historic Mayweather vs. McGregor fight transcended the sports world this weekend, becoming a true cultural phenomenon, with the fight even cracking the top 10 at the box office. However, for many consumers, the experience was marred by widespread outages all over the country, which prompted one Oregon man to file a class-action lawsuit against Showtime, after his pay-per-view live stream failed, causing him to miss the fight. While Showtime hasn't responded to the lawsuit itself, with Chris DeBlasio, Showtime Sports' VP Communications, announcing that the network will issue a full refund to any customer who purchased the event directly from Showtime and suffered outages. Here's what he had to say in a brief statement.

"We have received a very limited number of complaints and will issue a full refund for any customer who purchased the event directly from Showtime and were unable to receive the telecast."

Deadline also reports that Showtime will re-air the fight Saturday, September 2 at 9 PM ET/PT, followed by the premiere of the new reality series All Access: Mayweather Vs. McGregor Epilogue. The fight between undefeated boxing champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. and UFC champion Conor McGregor was live-streamed into 532 theaters by Fathom Events, earning $2.5 million for a solid $4,884 per-screen average, which was higher than any other movie in the top 10, even repeat box office champ The Hitman's Bodyguard. Still, for many who ordered the fight at home, the experience was marred by

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"On August 26, 2017 at 6pm PST, like thousands of other fight fans across the county, plaintiff turned on defendant's app in anticipation to watch the Mayweather fight. To his extreme disappointment and frustration, plaintiff (and thousands of other consumers) quickly learned that defendant's system was defective and unable to stream the Mayweather fight in HD as defendant had

advertised. Instead of being a "witness to history" as defendant had promised, the only thing plaintiff witnessed was grainy video, error screens, buffer events, and stalls."

The lawsuit includes a number of screenshots from the plaintiff, a Portland, Oregon man named Zack Bartel, which shows the poor quality of the picture the defendant saw, when the video feed was actually working. The lawsuit also reveals that the plaintiff was using "top-of-the-life software and hardware," including a fourth generation Apple TV, and that he was able to watch other streaming services such as YouTube and Netflix in "crystal clear HD, as usual," and he even took a speed test of his internet connection, but that wasn't what was causing the issue with the poor Mayweather Vs. McGregor live stream.

Chris DeBlasio also added that Showtime will address complaints from anyone who purchased the fight directly through the Showtime website or the Showtime app, but for those who ordered it through their cable or satellite provider should contact them in regards to a refund. The plaintiffs in the class-action lawsuit are seeking "actual damages" or $200 in statutory damages, or whatever is greater. The fight costs $99.99 to watch through various pay-per-view providers, with the lawsuit adding that this was the first major boxing pay-per-view fight that was available without a cable subscription. The Floyd Mayweather Jr. vs. Conor McGregor is expected to make upwards of $500 million in the United States and over $700 million worldwide.