Nobody may believe this, but EVERY film could be remade. There are many reasons for this. Sometimes it is done to improve on the previous film. Other times it is done to update a film from years past. There have no doubt been times that something was remade simply because that was a way to squeeze more money out of the property. And if Hollywood continues to employ this trend, sooner or later, every movie, no matter how classic, will probably get resurrected in some way shape or form. No matter how much fans don't want it to happen.

It appears that some films have gotten remade simply because there wasn't a good case against remaking it. If you're a studio head then the numbers make a lot of sense. People know the property, the characters, the story, etc. Nobody is going to be 'literally' hurt by remaking said film, the original will always be there is the argument. And heck, this could generate more sales for the original in one of the ancillary markets.

Today's media culture is like nothing anybody has seen before. You have people getting famous by posting videos of themselves by themselves. Everybody with a Facebook or Instagram account is a brand in some way. There is a respect for films and media icons that have come before now, but there's also an entrenchment (some call it fear) of what today's pop culture is and continues to become. The internet is truly the great democracy machine of our time. If you want to find something, belong to something, or see if something exists, all you need is a search engine and an idea of what you want.

It is because of the mash-ups and opinions that online culture has given us consumer overload. There's a million things to watch on TV, Netflix or any of the other content providers. Within this realm a space has been created where everything is pliable. Thing is, that hole needs to be filled. Fast. And what's the easiest way to pack it down? With something that needs very little original thought. Its fast food, the remake is the new frozen dinner. And while many fans will complain, they aren't going to stop coming anytime soon.

Recently, superhero movies have shown that no matter what our attachment might be to a certain star or character, anything can be redone and we'll be okay. Just see Spider-Man's reboots or Eric Bana, Edward Norton or Mark Ruffalo's portrayal of the Hulk if you don't believe me. Watching a movie used to be a singular or group experience that was talked about amongst friends. Nowadays, it is an experience that we not only share with others but often comment on in real time. With this being the case for the resalable, foreseeable future, we give you "13 Movies That Hollywood will probably Remake". And we also examine how they might fare in 2016's world of popular/technical culture with a more positive outlook on what these reboots could be in the long run.

The Godfather

Godfather

The first Godfather was made for $6 million and it grossed over 20 times that! Many lists rank this film as the best picture ever made. "Why mess with perfection?" You might ask? Because Hollywood can. And will. And does. No classic has stopped them before, just look at the upcoming Ben-Hur and Magnificent Seven remakes coming this year. The language of cinema has changed so much since the 1970s. Why not merge all three Godfather films into one? Speed up the pace and elongate the run time of the average film by 30 minutes? Cast a bunch of up and coming actors and possible set the film in the present day? It sounds overly audacious but if it worked, it would be groundbreaking and go a long way toward pushing the medium of film forward. Remaking the Godfather sounds blasphemous. But it could work. Though, it would defintely generate enough hate that it would probably bomb at the box office.

Bottle Rocket

Bottle Rocket

This first offering from Wes Anderson barely received a theatrical release before exploding on the consciousness of home video. It was made for $7 million and it made little more than half a million. Why remake it? Would anybody care? The beauty of this film is that it could be redone and still retain the spark that made it so special. Sure, the comic aspect of the film would have to be handled delicately, but with the right director (might Anderson consider redoing arguably his best film?), actors and work on the script, Bottle Rocket could ultimately prove to have a life in theaters of the Blazing Saddles variety.

License to Drive

License to Drive

This film was part of that 1980s era of moviedom that was speaking to a generation. For a lot of people, myself included, I came to this film on VHS. And, like most of the people watching the film, I wanted to be the character of Les (Corey Haim), who was lucky enough to date the enchanting Mercedes (Heather Graham). It was this passion that forced Les to take his grandfather's Cadillac out for a night on the town, regardless of the fact that he didn't have a license. So, why not remake this in 2016? Imagine all the fun you could have with social media alone. There could be people every step of the way chronicling how the Cadillac gets abused. Perhaps his father, while checking Les' Facebook, gets wind of all these posts that are coming up in his son's feed? This says nothing of Les' best friend Dean. Initially played by Corey Feldman, perhaps we bring back the Felddog for a second go round. Sure, it might be odd to have him being be buds with a 16 year old, but this License to Drive remake could break a few rules and be just fine. Perhaps fans wouldn't be so against it?

Dune

Dune

Some people consider this 1984 sci-fi offering to be amazing. Others think that it would be better left forgotten. One of them is the film's director who calls it a 75% nightmare. David Lynch cites not having final cut, apparently, something he knew going in, as the reason for his distancing himself from the film. Well, it's 2016, Lynch is continuing on with Twin Peaks, so why not remake Dune? Imagine the film he could make with today's technology? Heck, imagine what he could do with today's technology if he was given final cut, and allowed to go back into his original film and fix it? If people thought Paul Schrader having his version of The Exorcist 4 taken away and remade by Renny Harlin was an odd situation, imagine if Alejandro Jodorowsky was finally allowed to try his hand at his dream project?

Doctor Detroit

Doctor Detroit

Alright, throw Kevin Hart in this role and just watch the box office receipts stack up, right? You better believe it. In 1983 Dan Aykroyd made this role his own and in 2016 it stands to reason that Kevin Hart could as well. He's proven in movies like Get Hard and Central Intelligence that he can play both sides of the cool spectrum. The toughest part of this project would probably be updating the script which, by today's standards, seems as if it was written in the stone age. In fact, it might be kind of nice to infuse a little 1980s with the present day. When Doctor Detroit was released it grossed a little over $10 million. So it wasn't a mega hit but it also wasn't a failure. If they spent between $20-$30 million and got Hart to do his thing in this role, they could very easily reap three times that. Why? Audiences like Kevin Hart. They want to see him succeed. In a nutshell, that is at the heart of the Clifford Skridlow/Doctor Detroit character he would be embodying.

Watchmen

Watchmen

Zach Snyder's film was brilliant but it left audiences vaporized when they should have felt vindicated. Watchmen was a big movie with big ideas. The film that was released in theaters felt disjointed and ill configured. I know Watchmen isn't a superhero movie in the way that Batman v. Superman was, but Snyder directed both of those films and they truly seem to miss the mark. It isn't that Snyder didn't try to make Watchmen an epic (he released a Blu-ray version that was just shy of eight years long), but perhaps he just wasn't right for this material? Imagine Ryan Gosling as Rorschach or Night Owl? Put Olivia Munn in the role of The Silk Spectre. Basically, make this thing a bit more sexy (and coherent), get another solid but different director like David Fincher or a James Wan to revamp the material, and suddenly you have an epic film that could really connect with audiences.

Reservoir Dogs

Reservoir Dogs

I know what you're thinking, you don't mess with the perfect film, right? Well, when this film came out it was treated as anything but the success d'estime it ultimately proved itself to be. I'm not sure how long Reservoir Dogs was in the theater, but like some of the other films on this list, its savior was home video. Also, it came out in 1992. There's a whole generation of filmgoers who might think Quentin Tarantino's career started with the Hateful 8! Here's what this movie needs... a remake! Seriously! Get some young director, possibly a foreign one who isn't going to feel the need to Hollywoodize the material. Give it a meaty cast of newcomers, unknowns or straight character actors that are not new but not ancient. Something like this could throw light on not only the supreme greatness of the Reservoir Dogs concept, but the original Tarantino film as well.

The Matrix

The Matrix

Alright, this reboot is fairly simple. Lets be honest, the first film in the series was the best one. The second film was good but it meandered on and then tried to explain itself in mishmash dialogue. All that did was a big disservice to the film. After this came the third movie which was just a dry heave. So, how do you remake The Matrix? Simple, combine all three films into one two hour and forty five minute film. Cut down on how long it takes Neo to start believing that he's the one, take all the action from part two, and use about 10-15 minutes of the third film. Boom, you have a solid action, sci-fi movie in which a young actor (Tom Holland, anyone?) stars, and a potential casting coup if you could somehow get Keanu Reeves to play the Morpheus role in this incarnation.

Ferris Bueller's Day Off

Ferris Bueller's Day Off

From a technological/merchandising standpoint, the product placement alone could get this film funded. The original film came out in 1986. This is the dark ages to today's youth. They consider this time period (and this film!) old school, classic, whatever the hip way of saying "ancient" is. A remake could really do a lot to bridge the divide between the generations from the 1980s and the 2000s. First of all, have the film feature the son of Ferris Bueller. Then, have him more elaborately take his day off. In the first film he pulled a confidence game on his unsuspecting principal. This time, Ferris Jr. could hack into the school's computer, and possibly even create a hologram of himself! There may not be any reason for Ferris to take an actual day off, but, of course, he wouldn't really be at school. Eventually, the principal finds this out. From there, the remake could essentially follow the original, they would just be better served to "tech" things up a lot. Ultimately though, the longing we all have to be free of obligations, whether you are a 2016 student or a working stooge who came of age in the 1980s, is universal across the board.

Back to the Future

Back to the Future

Again, you probably want to throw me down a staircase, stand me up and then slug me in the face for even suggesting such heresy. However, there were a lot of missed opportunities in the first film. Imagine if Marty could go back a bit further and explore why Biff was such a blowhard? What if he messed up that aspect of the story and suddenly had to convince Biff to beat up his father George and get fresh with his mother? Imagine the movie following the video game on which the comic book for Back to the Future is based? Or, considering everybody's sometimes overzealous nature on behalf of their pets, this remake could focus on Einstein getting lost with the DeLorean and Marty and Doc have to find him? Whatever happens, this wouldn't be a classic remake. It would stay faithful to the BTTF mold but be something completely unique and fresh for 2016. In fact the new film could see Marty landing in 2046. Imagine what the future would look like then! Jaws 38 anyone?

Dead Poets Society

Dead Poets Society

Okay, I'm going to say an actor's name as I think he might be the only person to give this remake the gravitas that it needs. So, close your eyes, take a deep breath and just think... Jason Sudeikis. Before you skip to the next slide (or leave this website altogether), just know that this is something that would be very doable for Sudekis to do. He proved with his dramatic turn as Larry Snyder in Race that he's got the dramatic chops for this type of material. Mother's Day simply confirmed what we already knew. With him in this role (they could even set it in the inner city), Dead Poets Society would be fresh for a whole generation of viewers. Even if Sudekis wasn't the ultimate choice, imagine an Anthony Mackie (shared universe from the character he played opposite Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson, anyone?), or even Christian Slater embodying the role that Robin Williams immortalized.

2001: A Space Odyssey

2001: A Space Odyssey

In 2016, our world is finally starting to take stock of our past, present and future. The sum total of all this soul searching is how can we leave this rock a better place for future generations? The answer is that we need to live for more than ourselves. This single idea is at the heart of the original 2001, so why not update it? With the technological leaps and bounds since the original film (2001 itself was a technological milestone), something truly amazing and awe inspiring could happen here. In fact, they wouldn't have to mess with the original film that much. Sure, they could bulk up or trim certain areas, but 2001 is a movie of ideas and transcendence. As long as the remake stayed true to that, it could show viewers that we are the saviors we seek in the world before the time to come.

The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride

The first film was an outstanding triumph. It was loved and continues to be loved by any and all who see it. At the same time, fantasy films have only gotten more and more intricate as the years have passed. With films like Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, the fanbase for these kinds of movies has proven that these films will always have a box office audience. So why not incorporate a little Zelda and Minecraft into a remake? Maybe make it interactive and invest the viewers the way they're invested in those games? On top of that, every role in this movie is rich with scenery chewing moments for any actor. The story could be tweaked, some anachronisms from today could be added to comment on their absurdity, and with a quasi video game angle this could be one of the hottest projects going!

While some of these movies might sound like blasphemous to remake, it's bound to happen. And we, as fans, either have to embrace it or just let it happen, as we kick and scream in the aftermath. Ghostbusters proves that no franchise is safe. No movie is above a redo. If the story is good, the name recognizable, studios will attempt to squeeze a little more blood out of them. And there's nothing we can do. But if we embrace the good ones, perhaps it will get better in the future. One day, Hollywood will run out of movies to remake. That said, we have a long way to go to get to that Dude, Where's My Car remake. So just strap in and hold on. We have a few more decades of these reboots. Thing is, it doesn't ave to be as painful as everyone makes it sound.

Evan Jacobs at Movieweb
Evan Jacobs