1997 September Movies

 (1997)

Lolita

  • 67%
  • R
  • 137 min
  • Drama

A man marries his landlady so he can take advantage of her daughter.

 (1997)

The Game

  • 71%
  • R
  • 128 min
  • Drama

Nicholas Van Orton is a very wealthy San Francisco banker, but he is an absolute loner, even spending his birthday alone. In the year of his 48th birthday (the age his father committed suicide) his brother Conrad, who has gone long ago and surrendered to addictions of all kinds, suddenly returns and gives Nicholas a card giving him entry to unusual entertainment provided by something called Consumer Recreation Services (CRS). Giving up to curiosity, Nicholas visits CRS and all kinds of weird and bad things start to happen to him.

 (1997)

L.A. Confidential

  • 99%
  • R
  • 138 min
  • Crime

In a time when it seems that every other movie makes some claim to being a film noir, L.A. Confidential is the real thing--a gritty, sordid tale of sex, scandal, betrayal, and corruption of all sorts (police, political, press--and, of course, very personal) in 1940s Hollywood. The Oscar-winning screenplay is actually based on several titles in James Ellroy's series of chronological thriller novels (including the title volume, The Big Nowhere, and White Jazz)--a compelling blend of L.A. history and pulp fiction that has earned it comparisons to the greatest of all Technicolor noir films, Chinatown. Kim Basinger richly deserved her Supporting Actress Oscar for her portrayal of a conflicted femme fatale; unfortunately, her male costars are so uniformly fine that they may have canceled each other out with the Academy voters: Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kevin Spacey, and James Cromwell play LAPD officers of varying stripes. Pearce's character is a particularly intriguing study in Hollywood amorality and ambition, a strait-laced "hero" (and son of a departmental legend) whose career goals outweigh all other moral, ethical, and legal considerations. If he's a good guy, it's only because he sees it as the quickest route to a promotion.

 (1997)

Gattaca

  • 82%
  • PG-13
  • 106 min
  • Drama

The futuristic thriller Gattaca invites audiences to enter an alternate future in which "designer people" forged in test tubes rule society and genetics determine a person's future. In this world, a person with the right genetic stuff can do anything; but a person with even a slight defect or even potential for a defect is a prisoner of his own biological cells.

The film stars Ethan Hawke as Vincent Freeman, a young man determined to break out of his imperfect genetic destiny and see his dreams of traveling into space come true.

 (1997)

Cube

  • 62%
  • R
  • 90 min
  • Horror

The claustrophobic debut of Canadian director Vincenzo Natali takes seven strangers out of their daily lives and places them mysteriously in a deadly cube where they all agree they must find their way out. A mix of thriller and psychodrama and a small budget film that gained cult status.

 (1997)

The Edge

  • 60%
  • R
  • 117 min
  • Adventure

Thidden tensions between two men -- one an intellectual billionaire (Anthony Hopkins), the other a hotshot fashion photographer (Alec Baldwin) -- are gradually unleashed when they engage in a desperate struggle for survival after their plane crashes in the hostile Alaskan wilderness. One man eventually learns that the greatest danger comes not from Nature, but from fear, treachery and, possibly, murder.

 (1997)

Seven Years In Tibet

  • 61%
  • PG-13
  • 136 min
  • Adventure

In the autumn of 1939, Heinrich Harrer, the famous Austrian mountaineer, and his countryman Peter Aufschnaiter, set out to climb Nanga Parbat, one of the highest peaks in the Himalayas. The self-centered Harrer, whose sole preoccupation was the achievement of fame and glory, would experience an emotional awakening on his fantastic journey that would take him form the heights of conquest to the depths of internment in a British prisoner-of-war camp, then from escape and a harrowing two-year trek through the Himalayas to the mysterious Tibetan city of Lhasa.

As a stranger in a strange land which few westerners have ever visited, Harrer was befriended by the young Dalai Lama, and was asked to tutor the religious leader in English, geography and the ways of the Western world. He would eventually spend seven years in Tibet, during a period of tremendous political upheaval in that country, graced with the friendship and the spiritual enlightenment of the young Dalai Lama. As the deep and abiding bond between these two isolated, lonely people evolved, the selfish and egotistical Harrer experienced selflessness for the first time, allowing him to complete the emotional transformation which began on his way to Lhasa.

 (1997)

In & Out

  • 73%
  • PG-13
  • 90 min
  • Comedy

It all happened to Howard (Kevin Kline) faster than you could say "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." One of his former students (Matt Dillon) became a Hollywood superstar, and clumsily called Howard's sexuality into question--on the Academy Awards telecast, no less. Instantly Howard's tranquil life in Greenleaf, Indiana has turned upside down. Greenleaf has now become the scene of a media feeding-frenzy, with Howard as the bait. Peter Malloy (Tom Selleck), a slick and aggressive TV reporter, is determined to move in for the kill and get Howard to speak the truth. Meanwhile, Howard is only days away from his wedding to Emily Montgomery (Joan Cusack), the fiancee he's managed to hold at bay for a full three years.

 (1997)

The Peacemaker

  • 41%
  • R
  • 124 min
  • Action

Dr. Julia Kelly (Nicole Kidman), a nuclear scientist and head of the White House Nuclear Smuggling Group, and Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Devoe (George Clooney), an intelligence officer in the U.S. Army Special Forces, must join forces in a race to track down a missing nuclear device before terrorists can devastate the U.S. by detonating the device in New York.

 (1997)

Orgazmo

  • 47%
  • NC-17
  • 94 min
  • Comedy

"South Park" creator Trey Parker's film (which was created before South Park's success) centers on Mormon missionary Joe Young and his unusual entry into the pornographic movie industry.