Netflix offers some pretty credible titles this February like The 40 Year Old Virgin, The Drug King and Pretty In Pink just to name a few. There are also original titles which feature the much talked about Velvet Buzzsaw and High Flying Bird. Sometimes it's hard to choose what to watch and this list aims to make the choice a little easier.

Rather than list out every single new film coming to Netflix over the next 28 days, we have distilled this down to the best new titles. There are going to be some films that you've got to see. At the same time others will be mentioned that you're going to give a hard pass to.

Above all this list aims to make watching movies on Netflix easier. Sure, it's awesome to have thousands of movies at your finger tips. At the same time, the embarrassment of riches can often leave users not wanting to commit to one title for fear of missing out on something else. Clear your calendar and get ready to watch some films you can't see anywhere else but Netflix. At a time when the global box office is up because ticket prices are so high, it's nice to have a place to stream high quality content for less than $15 a month. One thing is certain, of the 12 titles on this list, you're bound to find more than a few things to watch.

Related: Amy Poehler's Wine Country Trailer Reunites SNL Favorites on Netflix

Velvet Buzzsaw (Streaming February 1)

Velvet Buzzsaw on Netflix

Roger Corman's A Bucket of Blood was a send up of the art world. It took great pains to laugh at the pretension and self serious nature of "artists." Velvet Buzzsaw doesn't just laugh at this whole creative scene, it chews it up, spits it out, then regurgitates it, only to again heave it into the toilet. Jake Gyllenhaal stars in this film which sees a bunch of paintings get unearthed from an artist that nobody ever knew existed. Suddenly, people who have traded commerce for art find themselves being dealt a very bloody blow by a supernatural entity. Playing an almost Warholian entity himself, Gyllenhaal is aided and abetted by Toni Collette, John Malkovich and Rene Russo in one of the most original films Netflix has ever made.

About a Boy (Streaming February 1)

About a Boy on Netflix

The likable and unlikable Hugh Grant is at his best here in Chris and Paul Weitz About A Boy. This tale of a delayed adolescent being shown the way to maturity by a man much younger than him, is a certainly a film for today's generation. The tone of this film begins light but as it edges forward it starts to get deeper and deeper. There's a humanity to the performances of Hugh Grant, Marcus Brewer, Toni Collette and the rest of the cast that is missing from most mainstream comedies. While there are certainly fluff films on Netflix, About A Boy is a welcome addition to this platform.

The Edge of Seventeen (Streaming February 1)

The Edge of Seventeen on Netflix

Arguably the most underrated film of 2016, Hailee Steinfeld crushes as the star of this coming of age tale. Actually, it's hard to call The Edge of Seventeen a "coming of age" film. I say that because Steinfeld's Nadine is both stunted and wise beyond her years. The crux of this film is when Nadine's best friend starts hanging out with her brother. Nadine deals with this the only way she can which is to say badly. Thankfully she has Mr. Bruner (an outstanding Woody Harrelson) by her side to both support and condemn her.

Pretty in Pink (Streaming February 1)

Pretty in Pink on Netflix

Is Netflix doing everything it can to make truly awesome teen movies from every generation available? Pretty In Pink is essentially Romeo and Juliet without the main characters dying. However, the way the characters treat each other is often a fate worse than death. Basically, Andie (Molly Ringwald) and Blane (Andrew McCarthy) love one another. The only problem is they come from two completely different social stratospheres. Can they be together? Will everything work out? Ultimately, that isn't even the point of this John Hughes classic. All the characters are so rich that by the end you can't help sort of loving them all.

All of the Jaws movies (Streaming February 1)

Jaws movies on Netflix

Love them or hate them the Jaws films are a good time. With Netflix making Jaws, Jaws 2, Jaws 3, and Jaws: The Revenge available to binge again and again, depending on your tastes, this is either the best or the worst entry on this list. It's no great secret that after Jaws the other films in the canon devolved from the Moby Dick tale that kicked this whole thing off. Jaws 2 saw the shark electrocuted. Jaws 3 was actually Jaws 3D. If any person reading this remembers how 3-D was in the 1980s, that should tell you all you need to know about that film. As for Jaws: The Revenge the shark comes after the family of the police chief that killed the saber-toothed creature in the first two films. Yes, you read that right.

High Flying Bird (Streaming February 8)

High Flying Bird on Netflix

Steven Soderbergh has had more ups and down in his career than your average NBA star. However, he keeps going and with High Flying Bird and shows just how cutting edge he still is. This film chronicles the NBA as it is now, just a much business as it is game. High Flying Bird isn't some nostalgic film meant to glorify the "love of the game." Taken from the perspective of a sports agent named Ray (Andre Holland), he and his big client are dealing with cash flow issues due to an NBA lockout. Necessity is the mother of invention and High Flying Bird shows us just how far people are willing to go when their money is on the line. This Netflix original is classy, current, and the kind of film that's destined to be mentioned in the "Best Sports Films" conversation at some point.

Remastered: The Two Killings of Sam Cooke (Streaming February 8)

The Two Killings of Sam Cooke on Netflix

One cannot hear the strains of Sam Cooke's "Bring It On Home to Me" and not understand that his was talent that was taken from us too soon. So how did he die? More importantly why did this phenomenal singer have to die? Director Kelly Duane de la Vega does everything possible to explore this topic. Clocking in at a svelte 74 minutes, Remastered: The Two Killings of Sam Cooke postulates that there have been much more to his death than meets the eye.

The 40 Year Old Virgin (Streaming February 16)

40 year Old Virgin on Netflix

The 40 Year Old Virgin works because despite being overly silly it's also a very smart film. This tale of a man whose never had sex teaming up with his buddies to make that happen is nothing new. What sets this film apart is a cast that includes Steve Carell, Catherine Keener, Paul Rudd, Seth Rogen and Romany Malco. The 40 Year Old Virgin could've been a middle-aged Porky's. That wouldn't have been bad but it would've ultimately underserved this film. There is a lot going on with all the characters, and that gives The 40 Year Old Virgin its emotional gravitas. Netflix could've simply made a "bro comedy" of their own. It's nice to see they acquired the best one they could instead.

The Drug King (Streaming February 21)

The Drug King on Netflix

Set in the 1970s this new offering from Netflix chronicles the rise of Lee Doo-sam (Kang-ho Song) in the Japanese Mafia. Movies like this can go a lot of different ways. At their best they're Goodfellas or Scarface. At their worst they're El Padrino with Damien Chapa. Thankfully, Netflix has erred on the side of the latter and users are the lucky recipients. Movies of figures rising up in various underworlds are nothing new. However, stylistically and subject matter-wise, Min-ho Woo's The Drug King easily sets itself apart from other contenders in the field.

Paddleton (Streaming February 22)

Paddleton on Netflix

Mark Duplass moves into very dramatic territory and gets a solid assist from Ray Romano in Paddleton. This film shows two people who are very different coming together when one of them gets a cancer diagnosis. Based on that, it might seem like this movie is going down familiar territory. In some ways it is. However, Director Alex Lehmann's Asperger's Are Us keeps things from getting too schmaltzy or milquetoast. The cast all turn in solid performances and make a movie that is a true celebration of life.

Evan Jacobs