Taron Egerton did an amazing job as Elton John in Rocketman. The glitz and glam, the powerful voice, the songwriting are all there and represented along with all of the excess. However, it's when Egerton goes deeper and takes viewers into John's private hell of cocaine and alcohol addiction that things start to open up and go further. Years of drug and alcohol abuse landed the rocker in rehab, where he is just a normal person, not a rich rock star with everything going for him. With that being said, Paramount has supplied us with an exclusive deleted scene from Rocketman, which features some more rehab.

Rocketman was released today on digital platforms and will be released on DVD and Blu-ray August 27th. The aforementioned deleted scene, entitled The Launderette, finds Elton John learning about his chores in rehab and sees him trying to learn how to work a washing machine. He ends up getting some help and sits down to reflect. While he seems to relax, one of his songs comes on the radio, which is promptly turned off by the woman next to him. It's only a minute long, so it's unclear why it was left on the cutting room floor.

In addition to The Launderette, the Rocketman deleted scenes also include an Introduction by Dexter Fletcher, I Love Rock And Roll, You've Got to Kill the Person You Were Born To Be, Arabella, Elton in the Gas Oven, Stylish Boots, You're Not the First Closet Queer with a Mummy Complex, The Blood Test, The Heart Attack, and Do You Want Anything? The digital version of the biopic comes with several exclusive features, including The Right Chemistry: The Ensemble Cast, Rocket Man: Anatomy of a Scene, Rocket Man Music Video - Taron Egerton sings the classic, and further Deleted and Extended Scenes: That's My Grandad's Name and The Morning After.

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The Digital, 4k Ultra HD, and Blu-ray releases of Rocketman come with over 75 minutes of bonus content. In addition to the deleted scenes, there are four extended musical sequences focusing on Taron Egerton's take on some of Elton John's most classic and best-known songs. There's even a feature that includes sing-along tracks of 13 songs, interviews with Elton John, the cast, and filmmakers, and footage from recording studio sessions. There's a lot to look forward to in this release for Elton John fans.

Rocketman is available to purchase digitally as of this writing after having a long success at the summer box office. For Elton John fans who were skeptical about the biopic, now is a great time to check it out from your home to see how great of a job Taron Egerton did as the legendary rock and roll performer. And while you wait, you can check out the exclusive deleted rehab scene below, thanks to Paramount.

Cinemark Movie Club
Kevin Burwick