Jon Favreau is being optimistic about the whole Spider-Man dispute between Marvel Studios and Sony. The director is currently down in Anaheim, California for the D23 Expo, mainly to discuss his upcoming live-action Star Wars series The Mandalorian. But, how could the Happy Hogan actor not get asked about his friend Peter Parker and all of the real-life drama going on behind-the-scenes? Favreau not only answered a question about the situation, but he put a positive spin on it, which may give fans some hope.

The Spider-Man debacle has pretty much overshadowed everything that has gone down this past week, which is understandable. Spider-Man: Far From Home just became Sony's highest grossing movie of all time and Avengers: Endgame recently became the highest grossing movie of all time, period. Anything having to do with Peter Parker is big news. Before addressing the controversy, Jon Favreau joked about it. He had this to say.

"After all that time, it took 10 years for him to get to a good relationship! It's still early days. As a fan, (I'm) cautiously hopeful that something will come together, because I think all the fans wanna see those characters together. I don't mean Happy and May, I mean Spidey with the MCU."

It is believed that Disney and Marvel studios want more money moving forward with sharing Spider-Man. The number has been reported differently over the past week, while it has also been reported that Sony doesn't believe they need Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios anymore. However, Jon Favreau throws some caution to fans, along with some hope. Favreau explains.

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"So, still early days. Things don't always -- what you read isn't always indicative of where things are now, so hopefully I'll find out more while I'm here... But as a fan, I'm hopeful that... you know, cautiously optimistic. Holding out hope that this isn't the final chapter of that story."

Jon Favreau would know better than anyone at this point in time. He works behind-the-scenes with Disney, Lucasfilm, Sony, and Marvel Studios, so if he's being optimistic, fans should be too. While he doesn't come out and say it explicitly, he does imply that the stories being reported aren't exactly accurate. In addition, he also states that it's very early on in the process, which is also good and proves there is more time to reach a deal in the coming weeks or months.

The main thing to take away from all of this is the fact that Jon Favreau is being cautiously optimistic about the Spider-Man situation. Marvel Cinematic Universe should follow suit and think positively. Pointing fingers at either studio isn't helping matters, though it does further prove just how much they need each other to keep the gravy train on the tracks. Entertainment Tonight was the first to report on Jon Favreau's thoughts on the Spider-Man debate.

Kevin Burwick