While the Sony hack appears to be over for the time being, more information is still coming forward that was leaked from various emails and documents from deep within the studio. By this point, everyone knows that Marvel was working hard to make a deal with Sony to bring Spider-Man into Captain America: Civil War. That deal never happened, but more details on exactly what was to take place have emerged, and they shed some light on the proposed The Amazing Spider-Man reboot that would have seen Marvel and Sony working close together. It is believed that Sony is still ready to reboot the franchise without Andrew Garfield in the lead.

Some of this new information both confirms and contradicts what we've heard in the recent past. It is speculated by CBM that some of the past information was made up by foreign bloggers looking to cash in on the Sony hack by publishing erroneous information. That has not been confirmed.

These new details suggest that the The Amazing Spider-Man would, and maybe even still will, cary on the story set up in Captain America: Civil War, which finds Peter Parker revealing his true identity to the world. While it has been 98.9% confirmed that Captain America 3 is moving forward without the Spider-Man character, and will instead focus more on The Winter Soldier, it's possible that Sony will still follow this idea that Peter Parker's identity is known to the world at large, which calls in the attention of The King Pin and other iconic villains. It's an idea that may play out in The Sinister Six, and sheds some light on how Captain America: Civil War could have worked in setting up the spin-off, which is still happening.

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If Spider-Man were to appear in Captain America: Civil War, Sony would have co-financed 25% of the movie. Marvel would have then co-financed 25% of The Amazing Spider-Man reboot, which is said to be coming to theaters in July 2017. The deal would have also allowed Sony to use two major Marvel characters in their reboot. This, in turn, would have insured Spider-Man's appearance in Avengers: Infinity War Part 1 in 2018. This would have been followed by a second standalone Spider-Man movie in 2019.

As previously reported, Sony wanted full approval on the Spider-man costume, script and casting, with the new actor said to be signing a three-movie deal. The deal would have made way for a collaboration between Marvel and Sony, with both studios having a say in how things played out. Kevin Feige is said to be the producer of the reboots, with Marvel having control of who replaces him if he leaves. Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach, the producers behind the current The Amazing Spider-Man franchise, would stay on as executive producers. And it must be pre-agreed between both studios that Drew Goddard write and direct the first solo movie. The Cabin in the Woods director is already confirmed to helm The Sinister Six for Sony, and served as a consulting producer on Marvel's Daredevil Netflix series.

The latest documents also gets more into the business side of the partnership. If Marvel misses any of its proposed release dates, Sony would be paid $100 million in damages. And the deal would be terminated. Sony is said to have only three years and nine months to start pre-production on their reboot, but Captain America: Civil War would have reset the clock on this period of time. Sony also asked that they have access to Disney in terms of accessible for Spider-Man's solo movies in regards to Disney owned TV channels, radio networks, theme parks, and more. The Marvel and Sony deal was to be announced during a big press event that was set to happen at a mutually agreed upon date and time.

These details come from internally within the studio, and are said to be a plan that was put together following discussions between Marvel and Sony. This was not the official proposal. While we've heard that talks broke down between Sony and Marvel, nothing has been officially confirmed by either studio. It is believed that a deal between Marvel and Sony may still happen.

B. Alan Orange