NO LONGER DESPERATE, GLOBES RETURN TO SUNDAYS

Now that ABC's Desperate Housewives is no longer the ratings behemoth that it once was, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, organizers of the Golden Globes ceremonies, has decided to move the awards show back to Sunday nights on NBC, published reports said today (Wednesday). They had aired on Monday nights since 2006, the year after they drew 16.8 million viewers, 10 million fewer than the previous year. Last year's awards show improved to 18.77 million viewers and this year's to more than 20 million.

PIRATES TICKETS GO ON SALE; MOVIE STILL NOT FINISHED

Tickets went on sale on some movie websites Wednesday for Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, which is scheduled to open on May 25. Nevertheless, L.A. Weekly columnist Nikki Finke reported Wednesday that final work on the film has not yet been completed. She quoted an unnamed source as saying, "It's a race to the wire for all the special effects. But, in its current state, it's quite spectacular." Finke claims that the budget for the film has already exceeded $300 million "and that's just what Disney is admitting to privately."

SONY RECALLING NEW DVD'S

Sony Pictures Home Entertainment has discovered the source of a problem in their recent DVD releases that prevented them from being played on some players, including some manufactured by the consumer electronics division of Sony itself. The company said the problem was caused by an update of its copy-protection system, which it continually updates in order to derail potential hackers. Among the DVD movies affected were Casino Royale, The Pursuit of Happyness and Stranger Than Fiction. Sony said that anyone who had purchased one of the discs and has experienced problems playing it may receive a replacement disk free of charge by phoning 800-860-2878.

SINGAPORE FILM FESTIVAL BATTLES CENSORS

An independent film festival in Singapore is contending not only with censorship within the island city-state itself, but with government crackdowns on films in the countries where they were produced, Daily Variety observed today (Wednesday). The trade publication noted that the Singapore censorship board refused to allow the screening of an animated Danish film, Princess, about the decline of a porn star, unless the festival removed three scenes. The festival refused. Singapore censors have also demanded cuts in a locally produced gay film, Solos. However, the festival is expected to screen the Thai film Syndromes and a Century, which was banned by the current Thai military government last week, and the Malaysian film, Village People Radio Show, about exiled former Communists living in Thailand, which has been banned by the Malaysian government.

POLITICAL UPROAR IN U.K. OVER GORE FILM

Al Gore's Oscar-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth has touched off a political uproar in Britain where the government had planned to distribute it to every secondary school in order to provoke student discussion about global warming. On Monday, British Education Secretary Alan Johnson said that he wanted children to see the film because they "are the key to changing society's long-term attitudes to the environment" and "have a big influence over their own families' lifestyles and behavior." However, the following day, a group of parents living in the New Forest, in the South of England, vowed to challenge the government's plans. Derek Tipp, their spokesman, told the London Daily Telegraph that the film amounts to political indoctrination and "is not therefore suitable material to present to children who need to be given clear and balanced, factually accurate information."

Brian B.