"BEST?" AND HOW!

Disney underestimated just how many parents on Super Bowl Sunday would drop off their kids at theaters showing Hannah Montana/Miley Cyrus: Best of Both Worlds 3-D. After predicting that the movie would earn $29 million, the studio learned Monday that Sunday's actual sales came in at $2 million more than it had estimated -- bringing the weekend total to $31.12 million. Playing on just 683 3-D screens, it averaged $45,561 per theater -- a record for any wide-release film and far surpassing the previous record of $35,540 set by Spider-Man 3. As word of the sales results came in, Disney announced that it would extend the release of the film on a market-by-market basis. Numerous 3-D theaters currently showing the Cyrus concert film have already been lined up by distributors of U2's upcoming 3-D concert film, due to open next week. However, several major cities now boast several 3-D theaters, including Los Angeles, where the El Capitan Theatre announced Monday that it would extend the run of the Cyrus film through March 1. (Disney owns the theater.) "We don't want to turn away kids from the theaters who couldn't get into the [live] concerts," Disney distribution chief Chuck Viane told USA Today.

The top ten films over the weekend, according to final figures compiled by Media by Numbers (figures in parentheses represent total gross to date):

1. Hannah Montana/Miley Cyrus: Best of Both Worlds 3-D, Disney, $31,117,834, (New); 2. The Eye, Lionsgate, $12,425,776, (New); 3. 27 Dresses, 20th Century Fox, $8,529,845, 3 Wks. ($57,245,093); 4. Meet the Spartans, 20th Century Fox, $7,336,595, 2 Wks. ($28,543,340); 5. Rambo, Lionsgate, $7,120,649, 2 Wks. ($29,918,795); 6. Juno, Fox Searchlight, $7,014,579, 9 Wks. ($109,828,029); 7. The Bucket List, Warner Bros., $6,725,460, 7 Wks. ($67,546,573); 8. Untraceable, Sony, $5,076,537, 2 Wks. ($19,127,089); 9. Cloverfield, Paramount, $4,842,031, 3 Wks. ($71,915,658); 10. There Will Be Blood, Paramount, $4,6541,62, 6 Wks. ($21,038,955).

CLEANFLICKS SAYS IT WAS DEFAMED BY ALLEGED PREDATOR

CleanFlicks Filed a federal lawsuit against Daniel Dean Thompson Monday, claiming that contrary to Thompson's claims, he was never "a partner, officer, affiliate, dealer, franchisee, collaborator, consultant or representative of any CleanFlicks entity in any capacity." Thompson was arrested in Orem, Utah last week on charges of having had unlawful sex with an underage girl. At the time he claimed that he was a co-founder of CleanFlicks and operated one of its franchises in Orem. Ray Lines, who now operates CleanFlicks Media, which, he says, offers "family-friendly movies" to families via the Internet, said in a statement that Thompson's claims, as reported in the news media, are false and harmful to his company.

BOX OFFICE FALLS IN JAPAN -- BUT WHY?

The Japanese box office in 2007 dropped 2.2 percent below the previous year, although admissions remained virtually flat, Daily Variety reported today (Tuesday), without explaining the reason for the lower gross. (The only apparent -- albeit unlikely -- explanation is that ticket prices were marked down somewhat during the year.) The Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan reported total earnings of $1.9 billion on 163 million admissions. The biggest hit of the year was Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, which grossed $103 million.

RAMBO IS NO HERO IN BURMA

Bootleg copies of Sylvester Stallone's latest Rambo movie are popping up all over Myanmar (Burma), despite efforts by authorities to prevent the film from being circulated, Reuters reported today (Tuesday). In a report from Yangon, the wire service said that the movie, in which the country's military junta is portrayed as the enemy, is "fast becoming a talking point among a population eager to shake off 45 years of military rule." Reuters indicated that a paraphrased line from the movie, "Live for nothing, die for something," has become a rallying cry within the country and has buoyed the resolve of opponents of the military regime.

BARRY MORSE, FUGITIVE DETECTIVE, DEAD AT 89

Barry Morse, best remembered for his portrayal of Lt. Philip Gerard, the police detective who relentlessly tried to track down Dr. Richard Kimble in The Fugitive, the 1960s' serial drama, died Saturday in London at age 89.

Cinemark Movie Club
Brian B.