MOVIE REVIEWS: PREMONITION

In his Good Morning America review of Premonition, ABC's Joel Siegel suggested that the filmmakers were asking for trouble. "It's like naming a car Lemon," he remarked. The critics bear him out. Joe Morgenstern in the Wall Street Journal: "After seeing the movie, I have postmonitions about Sandra Bullock (how could she have done it?) and her hapless filmmakers (how could they have done it so badly?)." Elizabeth Weitzman in the New York Daily News: "[We] sense our own premonition coming on: If [Bullock] doesn't start choosing her projects a little more wisely, she may wake up one day to the scary realities of squandered opportunity." Chris Kaltenbach in the Baltimore Sun: "Seeing the end of Premonition before the beginning could save everyone a lot of time." But Stephen Cole in the Toronto Globe and Mail, while calling the film "inescapable dull," nevertheless says he had a premonition that it will become the top film at the box office this weekend. On the other hand, Eleanor Ringel Gillespie comments in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution: "Premonition is probably two-thirds of a good movie, and sometimes that's enough. But I have a, well, premonition it may not be, especially when it comes to those all-important opening-weekend grosses."

MOVIE REVIEWS: I THINK I LOVE MY WIFE

Reviews for Chris Rock's I Think I Love My Wife are decidedly mixed. A.O. Scott in the New York Times calls it "smart and likable" while Lou Lumenick in the New York Post calls it "screamingly unfunny ... [an] exercise in misogynistic tedium." Several reviews take a dead-center position. Carrie Rickey in the Philadelphia Inquirer describes it as "a movie that provokes as many rueful sighs as it does bruising laughs." And Jack Mathews in the New York Daily News writes similarly: "For each joke that is fresh, there are at least three that fall thuddingly flat."

PRODUCER GRAZER TO BE EDITOR FOR A DAY AT L.A. TIMES

Imagine Entertainment founder and producer Brian Grazer has been selected by the Los Angeles Times to be guest editor of Current, the recently renamed Sunday opinion section. The newspaper said Thursday that future guest editors, who will be selected quarterly -- Grazer will launch the guest-editor program on March 25 -- will come from the worlds of politics, business, culture, entertainment and sports. "We asked Brian Grazer to kick off the program because we wanted to tap into his creative vision," Times editorial paged editor Andres Martinez said in a statement. "Brian's an ideal choice because his interests are notoriously wide-ranging, and often unconventional. His career is powered by an endless curiosity, and we thought it would be fun to hitch a ride along the way." (According to L.A. Weekly wrier Nikki Finke, Grazer was not paid for his editor-of-the-day stint.)

THEATER ACCUSED OF FAKING BOX-OFFICE RECEIPTS

The major movie studios have sued a Jackson, TN multiplex owner for allegedly faking box-office reports. In the suit, filed in Los Angeles on Wednesday, the studios claim that Ajay Theaters, which owns the Hollywood 16 multiplex in Jackson, had under-reported box office admissions and provided false serial numbers of tickets that it had sold. The alleged fraud reportedly began in March 2003 and has continued to the present day, the lawsuit alleged.

SPARTANS WIN BIG VICTORY IN GREECE

The Spartans were victors on their home turf last weekend. The latest box-office figures indicate that Zack Snyder's 300 raked in $3.1 million on 138 Greek screens (an average of $22,500 per theater) last weekend to set a record in that country. The film tells the story of the battle of Thermopylae, in which a band of 300 Spartans, according to historical lore, held back an army of thousands of Persians. It has been banned in Iran, where it was denounced as insulting and historically inaccurate.

Brian B.