EXTRA REVEALS INDIANA JONES PLOT POINTS

It's hard to believe that ticket sales for the next Indiana Jones movie could be affected in the slightest by the remarks of an extra working on the film to an Oklahoma newspaper. But Marvin Levy, a spokesman for Steven Spielberg, who is directing the movie, told today's (Wednesday) New York Post, "Who knows whether that particular person will ever work in this town again?" The Post, which posted no spoiler alerts, noted that an extra, who was due to perform as a "dancing Russian soldier," told the Oklahoma paper that: 1. The story concerns a search by Indy and the Soviet army for a priceless skull made of crystal, hidden in the jungles of South America; 2. Indy is taken hostage by the Russians who threaten to kill his ex-girlfriend and mother of his son if he doesn't cooperate; 3. One of the Russians is played by Cate Blanchett who questions Indy in the movie. The extra, a ballet dancer who was trained at the Bolshoi, said that his own big scene comes when he celebrates Indy's capture by dancing to a balalaika. However, the Post remarked that Spielberg, who is said to be "furious" over the dancer's revelations, is likely to cut his scene from the film.

OH, BOTHER. APPEALS COURT AFFIRMS REJECTION OF POOH CASE

A California appeals court on Tuesday upheld a trial judge's 2004 decision to toss out a lawsuit filed by the heirs of Stephen Slesinger, owners of the Winnie the Pooh rights, against the Walt Disney Co. because they had improperly searched Disney dumpsters looking for evidence and had thereby obtained thousands of pages of Disney documents, many of them marked privileged and confidential. Daniel Petrocelli, the attorney representing Disney in the lawsuit, had called the conduct of the Slesingers "an assault on the legal system." The heirs claim that Disney failed to pay royalties owed under a 1983 contract covering Pooh merchandise. A spokesman for the family said Tuesday that they would appeal the ruling to the California Supreme Court.

JUDGE FINES NEW LINE $125,000 FOR FAILING TO PROVIDE AUDITS

Seeming to undermine contentions by movie studios that their accounting practices are transparent and that profit participants in their films are free to examine their records, a federal judge has fined New Line Cinema $125,000 for failing to provide sufficient documentation about its revenue for The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring. Director Peter Jackson has sued the Time Warner-owned company, demanding details of the studio's audits for the film. However U.S. Magistrate Steven Hillman ruled that New Line had provided only a fraction of the documents requested by Jackson's attorneys in the discovery phase of the trial.

RESEARCH GROUP SAYS SONY MUST REDUCE BLU-RAY PRICES

Market research firm Forrester Research, which has long predicted that Sony's Blu-ray system will eventually win out over Toshiba's HD DVD as the format of choice for high-definition home video, expressed concern Tuesday over Sony's strategy. In its latest report, Forrester analyst J.P. Gownder maintained that Blu-ray must be able to compete effectively with HD DVD on price and that if it does not, it can lose its current edge. Gownder said that Blu-ray must introduce a player below $250 by Christmas and be more aggressive in promoting the system. Meanwhile, Home Theater Specialists of America, a group of specialty HDTV dealers and installers, announced Monday that its members would only be installing Blu-ray players from now on. The announcement came as a study was released indicating that Blu-ray was already installed in 92 percent of home-theater installations in the U.S.

BOSTON ICE CREAM COMPANY NAMES TOP MOVIE ONE-LINERS

Boston-based Brigham's Ice Cream Co. has announced the results of a survey it conducted over the summer to create a top-ten list of one-liners in movies. From what it said were thousands of entries, it narrowed the list to these: 1. "Are you talkin' to ME?," Taxi Driver; 2. "Go ahead. "Make my day," Dirty Harry; 3. "Here's lookin' at you, kid," Casablanca; 4. "I'll be back," The Terminator; 5. "I'll have what she's having," When Harry Met Sally; 6. "Life is like a box of chocolates," Forrest Gump; 7. "May the force be with you," Star Wars; 8. "You can't handle the truth!," A Few Good Men; 9. "You had me at hello," Jerry McGuire; 10. "You're gonna need a bigger boat!," Jaws. Conspicuously missing from the list was perhaps the most famous movie line of all: "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn," from Gone With the Wind, and the historic, "You ain't heard nothin' yet," from The Jazz Singer, the first sound movie. (And some may wonder about the non-inclusion of Garbo's "I vant to be alone" from Grand Hotel and the single word "Rosebud" from Citizen Kane. Cinemark Movie Club

Brian B.