i>LIGHT SHINES ON DAYTIME EMMYS

CBS nabbed 57 nominations for Daytime Emmy Awards Wednesday -- the most of any network -- with the daddy of all daytime dramas, CBS's The Guiding Light, which debuted on television in 1952, being showered with 17 of them. Another long-running soap, CBS's As the World Turns (1956), received 16 nods. The Ellen DeGeneres show Ellen was the most-nominated talk show with 12 nominations. Morning shows were removed from consideration for daytime Emmys, although a special morning-program list is expected to be announced in April. Emmy statuettes will be presented at the Daytime Emmys Awards Show, set to air live on June 15.

EVEN ABBREVIATED IDOL WINS WEDNESDAY FOR FOX

Wednesday night's American Idol results show was only a half hour, but that's all it took to give Fox a victory for the night. The show, which aired at 9:00 p.m., drew a whopping 17.2 rating and a 26 share. It also helped its lead-in and lead-out programs. Bones recorded a 7.2/12 in its first half hour at 8:00 p.m. and a 7.7/12 in its second. Following Idol, Fox's 'Til Death at 9:30 p.m. also captured first place with a 9.4/14. ABC's Lost took over first place at 10:00 p.m., but its 8.3/13 rating was well off its numbers of a year ago.

NBC SHOWS IN YOUR POCKET

Actors who have been accused of "phoning in" their performances are likely to find that they have a lot of company, following a deal struck Wednesday in which the MobiTV service will begin making NBC shows available to cellphone users. Under the plan, subscribers who pay $9.99 per month for the MobiTV service, would be able to watch several NBC, Telemundo, Bravo, Sci-Fi Channel, and USA Network shows on demand -- and without commercials -- on their cellphones for $1.99 per episode (plus usage). In addition, a number of shows containing ads will also be made available without additional charge. The MobiTV service is currently available on AT&T, Sprint-Nextel and Alltel wireless systems.

"SABOTAGE" PUTS PORN FILM ON PHOENIX STATION

No, Tom Brokaw has not had to resort to making porno movies since he stepped down as anchor of NBC Nightly News, but viewers who tuned in to see a Brokaw health documentary on KPPX-TV in Phoenix, AZ Wednesday were surprised to see a hardcore porno movie in its place. ION television, a "family friendly" broadcaster that operates the station, blamed "an act of human sabotage." It was not immediately clear whether other stations that were slated to receive the Brokaw broadcast also got the porno film.

WILL CHICAGO BE WONDERFUL TOWN FOR TRUMP?

The next season of Donald Trump's The Apprentice will likely be shot in Chicago, Chicago Sun-Times TV columnist Bill Zwecker reported today (Thursday), citing a source close to Trump and daughter/partner Ivanka. Miami and Las Vegas are also being considered, Zwecker said, but Chicago has the inside track because Trump is looking to promote his 92-story Trump Tower on the Chicago River, which is due to open early next year.

SIMPSON BOOK TO BE SOLD AT AUCTION

O.J. Simpson's aborted book If I Did It and his TV interview to promote it may see the light of day after all, following a ruling by a Los Angeles judge Wednesday. Superior Court Judge Gerald Rosenberg ordered that the book be sold at auction and that proceeds go to families of murder victims Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman. Original plans to publish the book and broadcast an interview with Simpson by publisher Judith Regan were spiked by Rupert Murdoch, whose News Corp controlled Regan's publishing company and owns Fox TV, the company that was set to air the interview.

NETWORKS ACCUSED OF BIAS IN REPORTS ABOUT DRUG INDUSTRY

The Business and Media Institute, a conservative TV watchdog, has accused the broadcast networks of portraying pharmaceutical companies as villains and giving them little credit for "breakthroughs and miracle drugs." In a report titled "Prescription for Bias," BMI, a unit of Brent Bozell's conservative Media Research Center (MRC), said that an analysis of 132 stories related to drug companies airing on ABC, CBS and NBC last year "found a recurring network news bias against the pharmaceutical industry, treating drugs as an entitlement rather than an expensive-to-create product." In a digest of the report, CNSNews.com, which is also a unit of the MRC, said that the networks gave "special treatment for left-wing causes," noting that 19 network reports "focused on drugs that were popular liberal causes, such as the morning-after pill or HPV [sexually transmitted human papillomavirus) vaccine Gardasil." Among the BMI report's recommendations: "When reporting on the costs of drugs, journalists should take care not just to report on the cost of drugs to the consumer, but also the costs borne by companies in researching and developing them."

Brian B.